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Great Moments in Foreign Government

Since I’m always reading and writing about government policies, both in America and around the world, I’m frequently reminded of H.L. Mencken’s famous observation about the shortcomings of “tolerable” government. If you take a close look at the world’s freest economies, you quickly learn that they are highly ranked mostly because of the even-worse governments […]

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‘If Russia and Saudi Arabia lead, rest will follow’…

or so says the Saudi energy minister on this historic oil deal. Well, maybe they will. But what if North America doesn’t follow? Let’s see, he’s talking about On Saturday, twelve non-OPEC countries, including Azerbaijan, Oman, Mexico, Sudan, South Sudan, Bahrain, Malaysia, Equatorial Guinea, Bolivia, Kazakhstan and Russia, agreed to cut oil production by 558,000 barrels per […]

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What Lesson Will Leftists Learn from another “Successful” Tax Increase?

Back in August, I acknowledged that lifestyle leftists in California won a real victory. They imposed a tax on sugary soft drinks in Berkeley and achieved a reduction in consumption. But I pointed out that their success actually was an affirmation of supply-side economics, which is simply the common-sense principle that taxes impact behavior. Simply […]

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The E.U.’s Federal System: Thwarting a Trade Deal with Canada

Dwarfed by the arduous trade negotiations between the E.U. and U.S., the E.U. and Canada actually completed negotiations on a free-trade deal in February, 2016. Ratification had to be pushed back from the fall. The drag from the “deep suspicion over the benefits of unrestricted trade” that was increasing globally was ostensibly the reason.[1] I contend that the true obstacle was the amount of sovereignty that the E.U. states still retained in the Union. Americans can think back to the Articles of Confederation as having the same major drawback. In the E.U.’s case, however, the Union had evolved past being a confederation, given the governmental sovereignty already at the federal level. The veto-power of a state government was thus out of place, and thus an obstacle for the E.U. even in fulfilling its existing responsibilities at the federal level.

The full essay is at “Trade Deal with Canada.”


[1] Paul Vieira, “Antitrade Sentiment Thwarts Talks,” The Wall Street Journal, August 30, 2016.

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Great Moments in Foreign Government

It would be impossible to pick the most hare-brained government policy. We have all sorts of bizarre examples from the United States. And we have equally “impressive” examples from other nations. And today, we’re going to augment our collection of bone-headed policies from elsewhere in the world. We’ll start with the United Kingdom, which already […]

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The angels of death threaten the sanctity of human life

This is something we see more overtly, in Europe than here, but we have the same forces here. And if we don’t keep guard, they will become even more overt, and to be honest, if we don’t hold the line, who will? By Niall McCrae writing in The Conservative Woman. A compromise between individual rights and […]

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Regulation Nation

If you look at the methodology behind the major measures of economic liberty, such as Economic Freedom of the World and Index of Economic Freedom, you’ll notice that each nation’s regulatory burden is just as important as the overall fiscal burden. Yet there doesn’t seem to be adequate appreciation for the importance of restraining red […]

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Statist Arguments Are Especially Weak When Using Apples-to-Apples Comparisons

While there are many things I admire about Scandinavian nations, I’ve never understood why leftists such as Bernie Sanders think they are great role models. Not only are income levels and living standards higher in the United States, but the data show that Americans of Swedish origin in America have much higher incomes than the […]

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Trudeau-nomics: Squandering Canada’s Fiscal Legacy, Risking Canada’s Economic Progress

In recent weeks, the bureaucrats at both the International Monetary Fund and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development have recommended that politicians should have a green light to supposedly stimulate growth by increasing the burden of government spending. Since the lavish (and tax-free) salaries for IMF and OECD bureaucrats are made possible by those […]

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More Regulation: Bad for Jobs and Entrepreneurship, Good for Corporate Cronies

When people think about government regulation, it’s understandable that they focus on things that impact their everyday lives. Most of us, for instance, are irked by government’s war against modern life. Bureaucratic pinheads in Washington think they have the right to plague us with crummy dishwashers, inferior light bulbs, substandard toilets, and inadequate washing machines. But what […]

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The Canadian Version of Great Moments in Human Rights

Just like I have a Bureaucrat Hall of Fame and a Moocher Hall of Fame to draw attention to spectacular cases of overpaid sloth and entitled dependency, I may have to set up something similar to commemorate bizarre examples of government-manufactured human rights. Most recently, for example, I cited a case in European courts dealing […]

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The Foreign Edition of Great Moments in Government

It would require several people, working around the clock, to provide daily updates about the bizarre and senseless actions of the crowd in Washington. And you’d need many additional people to monitor the foolish decisions in state capitals. I certainly try to do my small part, sharing example of jaw-dropping vapidity by our overseers in […]

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Is The Clinton Foundation Just A Foreign Laundering Scheme?

I’ve always thought it sad that we have commented more or less forever that we have the best Congress money can buy. particularly since it so often seems true. We deserve better but we are lazy and don’t demand it, so we don’t get it. Still this nonsense just leaves me shaking my head in […]

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Charles Krauthammer, Our Most Sympathetic Tory

Who doesn’t hang on every word of Charles Krauthammer? He is conservatism’s finest wordsmith, the last word on just about every outrage of government for the past 15 years. For many, Charles has been America’s Ben Franklin on every public issue, bringing a historic scope to the sociology and psychology of government andRead More

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The Top Five Events in 2014

OK, I admit it, this is a bit heavy (not to mention long) for a Saturday post but, this type of post hasn’t been seen here in quite a while, and I think Stratfor hit the nail very squarely on the head here. I’ll let you read it, and then I’ll have a few comments. […]

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Take Away That Foolish Bauble, the Mace

So said Oliver Cromwell, as he dismissed Parliament back in 1653. I suspect the Canadians disagree these days. You see carrying the mace (essentially a medieval club) is one of the duties of the Sergeant-at-Arms. But the job has an actual security component as well, the defense of the King (or the Speaker) is what […]

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Canada Shows How to Eliminate the Tax Bias against Saving

Since all economic theories – even Marxism and socialism – recognize that capital formation is a key to long-run growth, higher wages, and improved living standards, it obviously doesn’t make sense to penalize saving and investment. Yet that’s exactly what happens because of double taxation in the United States, as can be seen by this […]

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Oh, Canada…

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There is a nobility to the task of being an honor guard at a memorial to the fallen.It is a way to remember the sacrifice of those whom came before, of those who were willing to die so that future generations could live.

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One of those men was Cpl. Nathan Cirillo. He was one of three soldiers guarding Canada’s War memorial in Ottawa when he was shot down by a craven jihadi, a Canadian named Michael Zehaf-Bibeau who converted to Islam.

 

After murdering Cpl. Cirillo, he ran into the Canadian Parliament where he was eventually gunned down.

And for those who favor gun confiscation, members of Parliament said they owed their lives to Kevin Vickers, who fatally shot Zehaf-Bibeau just outside the caucus rooms where lawmakers were barricading themselves.

This is the second recent attack on Canada’s soldiers by local Muslims. Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent. a 28-year veteran was struck and killed and a second soldier injured by a Canadian jihadi, Martin “Ahmad” Rouleau in Quebec who ran into them with his car just two days ago.

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The Islamic State has called on Muslims to launch attacks in Western countries that have joined the U.S.-led coalition to combat them.

The stories of both Zehaf-Bibeau and Rouleau bear striking similarities. Both were converts to Islam and known to Canada’s counter terrorism forces. Both were a product of radical Imams in Saudi-funded mosques and both had their passports revoked after it became known they had been in contact with ISIS, yet they were still allowed to roam free.

Canada, the U.S., and other countries are going to have to take a serious look at what they’ve been allowing to occur in their countries. These will not be the last attacks.

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Canada’s PM Stephen Harper, as usual, rose to the occasion. Speaking to the nation on television, he said simply that the attacks were an attempt to intimidate Canada. “Let there be no mistake”, he said. “We will not be intimidated. Canada will never be intimidated.”

Unfortunately, own President Barack Obama lacked that insight, referring to the attacks as ‘senseless violence.’

There was nothing senseless about it. Terrorism doesn’t come out of nowhere, nor is it mindless. It is a tactic designed to achieve certain goals, no more no less. Only someone willfully blind or deliberately dissembling would think otherwise.

I doubt PM Harper is in either of those two categories, and I think Canada’s eyes have been opened.

There is one other small silver lining here. As Cpl. Cirillo lay dying, not only did his two comrades stand by him, but Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital and Barbara Winters, a lawyer and a former member of the Canadian Forces Naval Reserve heard the gunshots and ran towards them instead of away from them and joined the two soldiers to work as a team in desperately trying to keep Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, who was still conscious alive.

Aside from trying to staunch the bleeding with compresses, they comforted him, telling him how proud they were of him, how brave he was and how loved.

In the end he died in their arms, but not before taking that final bit of comfort with him as he left this earth.

If a warrior has to die, could there be a better way to make the passage?

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The Laffer Curve and Limits to Class Warfare Tax Policy

I’m a big advocate of the Laffer Curve. Simply stated, it’s absurdly inaccurate to think that taxpayers and the economy are insensitive to changes in tax policy. Yet bureaucracies such as the Joint Committee on Taxation basically assume that the economy will be unaffected and that tax revenues will jump dramatically if tax rates are […]

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A Lower Corporate Rate Is a Practical And Good Response to Inversions

It boggles the mind to think that the United States now has the highest corporate tax rate in the industrialized world. But it’s even more amazing that America arguably has the most punitive corporate tax rate in the entire world. Here’s some of what I wrote on the topic for today’s U.K.-based Telegraph. …the United […]

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