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War Gaming the Left’s Next Moves, An Introduction

Prologue I’ve been saying for years that this war can only end one way, especially since it became apparent the political establishment had no taste …

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Aleppo, Syria: A Complete Meltdown of Humanity

War is hell; everybody knows that. A ruling power of a government intent on depriving civilians of life during a civil-war battle in a major city can go beyond the typical battle casualties to cause what the U.N. has called a “complete meltdown of humanity.”[1] One question on the minds of civilians in rebel-controlled areas of Aleppo in Syria in December, 2016 was whether even eventual charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity were enough. From this standpoint, the world was shirking a basic human responsibility in not intervening to stop the intentional killing of civilians. Had the facts on the ground made going after war criminals after the fact a meager excuse for not having acted in real time? Does the world, in other words, have a duty to step in when a government has turned on its own people—not counting soldiers and their suppliers, or does internal affairs encompass even such governmental conduct?


The full essay is at “A Complete Meltdown of Humanity



1. Reuters, “Battle For Aleppo Ends as Rebels Agree to Ceasefire,” The World Post, December 13, 2016.

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The DFL’s blue collar civil war

John Gunyou’s op-ed should get the DFL’s attention. The question is whether the DFL will hear it or whether they’ll pretend it wasn’t written. With delegates to this weekend’s DFL Central Committee meeting set to debate (or table?) Resolution 54, it’s time that the DFL made a decision. Gunyou lays it out perfectly, saying “Accordingly, […]

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Sometimes I Think I’m in England in 1938

Sometimes I think I’m living in England and it’s 1938. In 1938 every Brit knew there was a war coming, and had known it since 1936 when Hitler re-militarized the Rhineland, against the Versailles Treaty, and neither Britain nor France raised a finger to stop him. We only learned after the war that had BritainRead More

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America’s “dark chapters”

This weekend, after he met with Raul Castro, President Obama continued his hate America tour, declaring that he was “very aware of the fact that there are dark chapters in our own history.” There’s no doubt that this nation has seen dark chapters during its history. While the darkest of those dark chapters is either […]

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Guest Post: 150th Anniversary Of America’s Victory at Appomattox [del.icio.us]

Today marks the 150th Anniversary of the surrender of General Robert E. Lee to General Ulysses S. Grant at the Appomattox Court House! This article by Frank Scaturro sets the record straight about the Civil War and how the outcome molded US history!

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Guest Post: 150th Anniversary Of America’s Victory at Appomattox

Today marks the 150th Anniversary of Gen. Lee’s surrender to Gen. Grant at Appomattox Court House!
This article by way of the WSJ was written by Frank Scaturro who serves as the President of the Grant Monument Association.
Throughout his long life, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. was profoundly affected by his experience fighting in the Civil War. The future Supreme Court justice recalled two decades later that “in our youth our hearts were touched with fire. It was given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing.” Long after the passing of the generations that lived through the Civil War, our collective national memory sets apart the era from most others in our history. But our recall ebbs and flows and, perhaps like most memories of powerful experiences, is sometimes marked by change in how we understand what we do remember.
What remains consistent as we mark the 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender is the iconic scene at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. After 11 months of intense fighting since their first encounter on the battlefield, the victorious Union commander, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, met the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee, in the parlor of the McLean House. 
Lee’s troops were paroled, meaning they could return home, and were given rations from Union wagons. Those who owned horses could keep them, and officers could retain their side-arms. Grant’s magnanimity was nearly unheard of in a civil war, and Winston Churchill later wrote that it “stands high in the story of the United States.”
Much of our nation’s memory of the surrender has been clouded by the Myth of the Lost Cause, a literary and cultural movement that arose after the war to ennoble the Confederacy and those who fought for it. Embraced by most vocal former Confederates and their intellectual descendants among generations of historians, the myth made its historical mark in several respects.
First, the role of slavery in the secession of the Confederate states has been played down, as has the fundamentality of emancipation to the Union cause during the second half of the war. Once slavery was nationally repudiated, apologists for the losing side constructed a narrative in which the reasons for fighting shifted to more sympathetic aspects of the antebellum South.
Because of the post-Reconstruction retreat from civil rights, few Americans know that three constitutional amendments—the 13th, 14th and 15th—ratified after the Civil War conferred legal equality on former slaves. These long-ignored amendments provided the foundation of the 20th-century civil-rights movement, which was arguably at its peak 50 years ago with passage of the Voting Rights Act. That coincided with the close of the Civil War Centennial, during which few prominent historians challenged Lost Cause interpretations of race.
The Myth of the Lost Cause also distorts our understanding of the military leadership that brought about Union victory, dismissing the outcome as the inevitable result of the Union’s numerical and industrial superiority. We know from the past 50 years alone—prominently, the Vietnam War and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan—that superiority in numbers alone does not win wars. Before Grant arrived, a total of six Union commanders in the East had failed to achieve the decisive strategic victory that was necessary to defeat the Confederacy.
Memory of the Civil War has been distorted down to numbers, as evidenced on the plaque at Appomattox that asserted “Lee surrendered 9,000 men . . . to 118,000 men under Grant.” Those last five words were recently removed from the plaque, but both numbers are incorrect. As recounted in Elizabeth R. Varon’s “Appomattox” (2014), the most reliable estimates indicate that the weeklong campaign leading to the surrender began with nearly 80,000 Union soldiers pursuing 60,000 Confederates and ended with 60,000 Union and 30,000 Confederate troops near Appomattox.
Today, bells will ring across the nation, starting at Appomattox at 3 p.m.—the approximate time the terms of surrender were concluded and signed—and then at 3:15 for four minutes (representing the four years of the Civil War) at schools, historic sites, churches, temples and public buildings across the land. The National Park Service announcement offers several interpretations: “Some communities may ring their bells in celebration of freedom or a restored Union, others as an expression of mourning and a moment of silence for the fallen.”
It should be clear, however, that what happened at Appomattox determined the survival of the United States and made possible the freedom it promised to those who were denied it. Few events in history possess existential importance to the success of the American experiment, and none surpasses this one in magnitude.
Mr. Scaturro, a partner at FisherBroyles LLP and author of “President Grant Reconsidered” (Madison Books, 1999), served as counsel for the Constitution on the Senate Judiciary Committee, 2005-09.

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Their Last Full Measure The Final Days of the Civil War By Joseph Wheelan

Wheelan has written a powerful and absorbing account of the final days of the Civil War. He includes Lincoln’s assassination, the manhunt that followed and the failure of Reconstruction, as well as the post war lives of key military and civilian figures. Even readers steeped in Civil War history will find it worth their time and attention.

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Obama and the Looming Immigration Street Fight

If I had my druthers, the coming melt down of the relationship between the American government and its people would arrive for a more noble cause. But as always, when the people speak, you make you plans accordingly. I wish, for reference, you could all read the approximate 90 pages inRead More

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PolyMet fight still divides DFL

Despite the DFL’s best efforts to paint over the Polymet/environment issue, it’s clear from this article that the DFL is deeply divided: Democrats averted a nasty public fight Sunday over a controversial Iron Range copper-nickel mining proposal that has vividly split powerful party factions. Activists at the state DFL convention decided against debating a proposal […]

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Will the DFL cave on bonding bill?

This article hints that it’s possible the DFL won’t get a bonding bill passed this session. I’m highly skeptical of that happening. Construction borrowing bills need a 60 percent threshold to pass, but House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt said his caucus is not yet willing to put up the eight GOP votes needed until Democrats […]

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THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC: ITS CONSTITUTION, TENDENCIES, AND DESTINY by Orestes Augustus Brownson

There is a good deal to think about in this book and what it has to say will challenge the modern Right as well as Left. The former, depending on his religious beliefs, may be more inclined to give it due consideration, despite it’s challenging propositions. The latter are the very people that Brownson warned about, and will no doubt dismiss it as a religious rant, despite the clarity of Brownson’s arguments.

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267 Words

267 words. Spoken by a President of the United States. Spoken in the midst of a great Civil War, on a battlefield, to help dedicate a military cemetery. 267 words, that redefined a free people, for the next century and a half 267 words that lead directly to the freedom of the western world from […] . . . → Read More: 267 Words . . . → Read More: 267 Words

Obama ignores Lincoln, snubs history of Gettysburg

Last night, Megyn Kelly interviewed Salena Zito of the Pittsburgh Tribune Review about President Obama’s foolish decision to not attend the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Here’s the video of that interview: Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com What’s incredibly stunning is that President Obama has frequently cast himself as a modern-day Lincoln, which […] . . . → Read More: Obama ignores Lincoln, snubs history of Gettysburg . . . → Read More: Obama ignores Lincoln, snubs history of Gettysburg

Seward Lincoln’s Indispensable Man By Walter Stahr

Stahr‘s extensively researched biography is also a sweeping history of the years before and after the Civil War. It could not be otherwise. William Henry Seward, helped shape, not only those tumultuous years, but also our own time. This book belongs in the library of anyone seriously interested in American history in general, and the Civil War period in particular. Walter Stahr is both an astute biographer and a gifted writer. It’s a cliché to say that he makes history come alive, but it is the truth. . . . → Read More: Seward Lincoln’s Indispensable Man By Walter Stahr . . . → Read More: Seward Lincoln’s Indispensable Man By Walter Stahr

Artillery Hell and Vittles

Every American opponent in battle from the Confederates on, have come away from the battle in awe of American firepower, and by extension, airpower. That tradition started 151 years ago this week in a Maryland cornfield. This battle included the single bloodiest day in American history. That anniversary was yesterday. Here’s what General Hooker (and yes, gentle […] . . . → Read More: Artillery Hell and Vittles . . . → Read More: Artillery Hell and Vittles

The Caning By Stephen Puleo

Puleo has done a masterful job of evoking the color, politics and passions of the six years preceding the Civil War. Within the book’s covers are many familiar personages, among them, L.Q.C. Lamar, William Seward, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Roger B Taney. In addition, are others who have faded into the shadows of history. One of those is the South Carolina congressman who delivered The Caning. . . . → Read More: The Caning By Stephen Puleo . . . → Read More: The Caning By Stephen Puleo

Big Wheels Rollin’

In many ways Americans define the essence of America as movement. From nearly the earliest days that has been one of our defining characteristics, moving around, nearly always tending west but always moving and always in a hurry. The very first thing we became famous for around the world were the clipper ships. These very […] . . . → Read More: Big Wheels Rollin’ . . . → Read More: Big Wheels Rollin’

Gettysburg, Vicksburg and Obama’s War Against the States

The Liberal Democratic Party’s war on the South, Judeo-Christian values, affordable energy and food, men, women’s wombs and the family Eleven score and 11 years ago tomorrow in Philadelphia, the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence from a distant King and Parliament thereby bringing forth on this continent a new democratic republic, conceived in Liberty, to be governed of, by and for the | Read More » . . . → Read More: Gettysburg, Vicksburg and Obama’s War Against the States . . . → Read More: Gettysburg, Vicksburg and Obama’s War Against the States

Chris Matthews – Time travels back to the Civil War

Chris Matthews might not be suffering from tingling legs anymore, but it looks like he’s taken to time travel – maybe he read Kurt Vonnegut too many times? Who knows? No matter what, this is priceless! Of course, the whole time-travelling back to the War of Northern Aggression isn’t new. Sheila Jackson Lee apparently did

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