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Carbon Taxes: Worrisome in Theory, Bad in Reality

I don’t have strong views on global warming. Or climate change, or whatever it’s being called today. But I’ve generally been skeptical about government action for the simple reason that the people making the most noise are statists who would use any excuse to increase the size and power of government. To be blunt, I […]

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Mrs. May Goes to Washington

And so, Mrs. May is here. Came over yesterday, and will meet the President today. That’s as it should be, she’s first, the leader of our oldest friends, and strongest ally, and our cousins, so kind of a family reunion. Last night she spoke at the Republican Congressional winter retreat, the first world leader to […]

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An Inaugural Reflection

The American inauguration is one of the great traditions of the American Republic, and of freedom itself. But why? First because since 1800, no matter what, the office of the President, which has come to be the most powerful job in the world, transfers completely peacefully from one incumbent to the next. Yes, there are often […]

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Interegnum

Not in the classical sense, of course. Not for a second is the US Presidency vacant. That is why the Vice President is sworn in first. If something had happened to Obama and Trump yesterday, Pence would have simply taken over. As nearly always, the founders provided for all possibilities. Here is, what President Trump […]

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Cultural Blasphemy ? More Like Americanism

Ace quoted this piece the other day and called it very good. I agree. Yes, in Newsweek, and also yes, its liberal bias is pretty obvious. But you know we all filter things through our experiences and thus are biased. No less me than Michael Wolf. But things do work better when we talk to […]

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The Golden Age of Innovation Refuted

“By all appearances, we’re in a golden age of innovation. Every month sees new advances in artificial intelligence, gene therapy, robotics, and software apps. Research and development as a share of gross domestic product [of the U.S.] is near an all-time high. There are more scientists and engineers in the U.S. than ever before. None of this has translated into meaningful advances in Americans’ standard of living.”[1]The question I address here is why.
The essay is at “Golden Age of Innovation.”


1. Greg Ip, “Economic Drag: Few Big Ideas,” The Wall Street Journal, December 7, 2016.

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Young Japanese: An Early Verdict on Climate Change

Is the verdict in, and have we, mankind, lost our own self-inflicted climate battle? Is this what Japanese millennials were saying in 2016 when, according to a government survey, only 75 percent expressed interest in climate change, whereas close to 90 percent of the same age group (18-29) had expressed interest just a few years earlier?[1]Their intuition may have been the proverbial canary in the coal mine.
The full essay is at “An Early Verdict on Climate Change.”


1. Tatiana Schlossberg, “Japan Is Obsessed with Climate Change. Young People Don’t Get It,” The New York Times, December 5, 2016.

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Engineering Club Sensible

By outlook, if not degree, I’m an engineer. My basic question is always, “Will it work, as designed, and can we build and run it on budget (or below)?” As far as I’m concerned, it’s what built the world we live in. It has nothing whatsoever to do with good intentions, it has much indeed […]

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Springtime for China’s Coal Industry: Is China Too Big to Swerve Enough to Avoid the Climatic Iceberg Ahead?

Even as Chinese government officials “called on the United States to recognize established science and to work with other countries to reduce dependence on dirty fuels like coal and oil,” China was “scrambling to mine and burn more coal.”[1]Notably, short-terms concerns were dominant. “A lack of stockpiles and worries about electricity blackouts” were “spurring Chinese officials to reverse curbs that [had] once helped reduce coal production.”[2]By December, 2016, coal mines were reopening, and with them coal miners were returning to work. The renewed activity would of course make it more difficult for China and the world to meet CO2 emissions targets, “as Chinese coal is the world’s largest single source of carbon emissions from human activities.”[3]In fact, China’s use of coal results in more emissions “than all the oil, coal, and gas consumed in the United States.”[4]The implications for being able to contain the global rise in temperature within 2 degrees C are not bright from this real-life scenario. It is important, therefore, to grasp the underlying dynamics behind China’s plight.
The full essay is at “Springtime for China’s Coal“.


1. Keith Bradsher, “Despite Climate Vow, China Scrambles for Coal,” The New York Times, November 30, 2016.
2. Ibid.
3. Ibid.
4. Ibid.

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100 Days and Firing Squads

In case you missed it, PE Trump called a meeting with some of the major media figures and unloaded some truth on them. Needless to say, they didn’t like it. Well, one gets to lie in the bed one makes, and Trump, like many of us, is apparently tired of being lied about. Bill Whittle […]

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Obamacare repeal pessimism

Considering their liberal leaning, it isn’t surprising that Vanity Fair is running interference for Obamacare. In their opinion, the “pressure will be on Republicans to fix the $3 trillion U.S. health-care system they have derided for years—and they will have no one to blame but themselves if the insurance market is upended and millions of […]

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Trust Robert Reich’s blueprint?

Democrats should follow Robert Reich’s blueprint to revitalize the Democratic Party. One of the parts of the article that’s interesting reading the part when Reich starts talking about insiders. Specifically, he said “the Democratic party apparatus is ingrown and entrenched. Like any old bureaucracy, it only knows how to do what it has done for […]

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The Year of Political Revolution |

The title comes from a talk that Nigel Farage gave at David Horowitz Freedom Center’s 2016 Restoration Weekend, to me it’s appropriate. It seems to me that what we have seen this year is the incipient conservative counter-revolution taking shape, first Brexit, then Trump, tomorrow…well who knows. As I said again the other day, the Anglo-Saxons […]

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The First 100 Days

If you know American history, you know that the first hundred days of a new president – especially one much different than his predecessor – have a legendary quality. That’s been true since 1933 when Franklin Roosevelt forced through all sorts of ’emergency’ measures (most of them unconstitutional) to supposedly relieve the depression. That they […]

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State Senator writes to Ohio Power Siting Board

Seems pretty rare these days, a politician writing the plain truth. Refreshing, too. here it is. Dear Ohio Power Siting Board, As a non-voting member of the Ohio Power Siting Board, I write to place of record my response to the October 24, 2016 comments of the Ohio Environmental Council (OEC) regarding Rule 4906-04-08 and proposed […]

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CO2 Record-Level in Atmosphere: Implications for Human Population

In 2015, average global CO2 levels for the year surpassed 400 parts per million for the first time, the WMO revealed in its 2016 annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin. At the time, any scientists regarded that ratio of carbon dioxide to other gases in the atmosphere as a “climate change touchstone.”[1] Curiously, however, 400 ppm was not considered a tipping point. It was still possible to reverse the progression of the ratio—yet no one seems to ask how long that would take. In this regard, the ratio’s accelerating rateis particularly telling. Practically speaking, 400 ppm may in fact be a tipping point.

The full essay is at “CO2 Record-Level.”


1. Lydia O’Connor, “The Planet Just Crossed Another Major Carbon Milestone,” The Huffington Post, October 25, 2016.

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The Beautiful Lie

Have you seen this, yet? It has about 600,000 views on YouTube. Steven Heyward over at PowerLine comments, “Here you will take in a typically politicized student, at South Africa’s University of Cape Town, arguing that “Science as a whole is a product of western modernity, and the whole thing should be scratched off.” The audience […]

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4 Reasons Globalism Won’t Retreat Anytime Soon

Rachel Lu brings a whole load of common sense for us to ponder… Globalism is in full-on retreat, or so I’ve been given to understand. Cosmopolitans, your name is mud. This is the year when conservatives start thumbing their noses at soft borders, interventionist foreign policy, and even free trade. We’re sick of liberals and […]

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Hurricane Hysteria [Updated] | Power Line

From Powerline, with no comment,  because none is required. The much-hyped Hurricane Matthew still hasn’t made landfall. It has been downgraded to a Category 2 hurricane as it makes its way up the Southeastern coast. It may yet do great damage here, as it already has in Haiti, but the disappointment in some quarters is […]

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King Coal and Freezing in the Dark

We talked about the South Australia blackout the other day, but I want to say a bit more. The Spectator AU tells us this: State governments are sheltered workshops for mediocre politicians rarely good enough to make it in the Canberra big league. They have just one basic task in the Australian federation: to maintain […]

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