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Laurence Tribe’s ill-informed opinion

Laurence Tribe’s op-ed about the King v. Burwell ruling is typical progressivism. It’s all about rationalizing a terrible, wrong-headed decision. Tribe made some statements that deserve rebutting. This is one of those statements: The Supreme Court correctly applied standard interpretive methods in holding that, despite the apparent clarity of those four words, the law makes […]

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Rebecca Otto’s challenge

It’s looking like Rebecca Otto will file a lawsuit to prevent private auditors from conducting audits: State Auditor Rebecca Otto Wednesday reiterated her determination to take a recent change to her office’s responsibilities to court unless legislators repeal the new rules in a special session. “They’re going to have a special session and they can […]

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Megyn Kelly grills defense attorney

Last night, Megyn Kelly demolished defense attorney Arthur Aidala’s argument that no state laws were broken when the Duggars’ daughters were identified as victims of sex crimes. Check this video out: First, here’s the Arkansas law that’s being debated: Arkansas Legal Code ANN. SEC. 16-90-1104 “A law enforcement agency shall not disclose to the public […]

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Megyn Kelly grills defense attorney

Last night, Megyn Kelly demolished defense attorney Arthur Aidala’s argument that no state laws were broken when the Duggars’ daughters were identified as victims of sex crimes. Check this video out: First, here’s the Arkansas law that’s being debated: Arkansas Legal Code ANN. SEC. 16-90-1104 “A law enforcement agency shall not disclose to the public […]

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Mosby’s silencing strategy

When Marilyn Mosby made her first public appearance on the Freddie Gray case, she made a huge mistake, saying that she’d “seek justice for Freddie Gray.” That’s a major mistake because ‘Lady Justice’ wears a blindfold. There’s a reason for that. That’s because justice is determined by wherever the facts take investigators. Ms. Mosby started […]

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Judge rejects DOJ request

Judge Andrew Hanen refused to lift his temporary hold on President Obama’s executive action, saying that the DOJ hasn’t “shown any credible reason for why this Directive necessitates immediate implementation.” Here are the arguments both sides are making: The coalition of states leading the challenge filed its lawsuit to overturn Obama’s executive actions, which would […]

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FOIA with teeth

Sharyl Attkisson’s latest post highlights a disturbing pattern of behavior within the federal government: After the appeal, the F.B.I. told me that its original claim (that it had no information about me) was a mistake and the agency promised to reprocess it. More time passed, and the F.B.I. sent me a few pages of cryptic […]

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Progressives’ definition of justice

This article shows that progressives’ definition of justice isn’t predicated on verifiable facts. It’s proof that Democrats’ definition of justice is mostly about perceptions and allegations. The trouble is that the United States, for far longer than it has been a “nation of laws”, has been a nation of injustice. And in the absence of […]

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Davenport’s disaster, Part II

This post about Richard Davenport’s termination of Coach Todd Hoffner highlights the timeline of Mankato State University, Mankato’s investigation that ultimately led to Coach Hoffner’s termination. This post will highlight the OLA’s report of what happened that triggered the investigation: On August 10, 2012, Coach Hoffner asked a MSU, Mankato information technology staff person to […]

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Davenport’s disaster, Part I

If Minnesota State University, Mankato President Richard Davenport is in a tight spot, it’s a spot of his own making. According to the OLA’s report into Todd Hoffner’s termination, we now know that President Davenport notified Coach Hoffner that Davenport had made a “tentative decision” to terminate Coach Hoffner’s employment at MSU, Mankato in a […]

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Liberals still spinning Halbig

Jeffrey Toobin’s article isn’t factually accurate: As Congress originally conceived it, the A.C.A. called for each state to set up its own exchange with a Web site, which most of the blue states and a few of the red ones did. But two dozen of them did not, so the Obama Administration established a federal […]

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Watchdog exposes Democrats’ witch hunt machine

Thanks to this article by the Wisconsin Reporter, conservatives can learn about the Democratic Party’s witch hunt machine. Anyone that thinks Democrats are nice people that conservatives simply disagree with is badly mistaken. Read the article, then tell me that: MADISON, Wis. – Conservative targets of a Democrat-launched John Doe investigation have described the secret […]

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Jonathan Gruber, stylish flip-flopper edition

When the Halbig v. Burwell ruling came out last week, lefties like the New Republic reached out to Jonathan Gruber after their initial spin failed. Their initial spin consisted of this being a drafting error which should be excused by the courts. When conservative bloggers found a video of Jonathan Gruber saying that health insurance […]

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Obamacare, subsidies and Jonathan Gruber’s flip-flopping

Lefties went apoplectic this week after the DC Circuit issued its ruling in the Halbig v. Burwell lawsuit. Their initial spin was that it was “a drafting error.” Sean Davis’ article laid out the foolishness of their spin. While Davis’ article buried the administration’s spin with irrefutable facts, something that Jonathan Gruber said might hurt […]

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Sloppy assumptions, bad laws Part II

Sean Davis’s article utterly demolishes the Left’s argument that the DC Circuit was willing to throw millions of people off health care because of a “drafting error.” Here’s a key portion of Davis’s demolition of that argument: Let’s take a step back to see how plausible that explanation is. There are two types of exchanges: […]

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Sloppy assumptions, bad laws

The whining on the left hasn’t stopped since the DC Circuit Court’s ruling on Halbig v. Burwell. This article is a perfect example of the Left’s whining: The Affordable Care Act was designed to offer premium tax credits (subsidies) to people to purchase private health insurance on government-run exchanges — at least those earning up […]

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Ambiguous or straightforward?

I’ve spent the last half of Tuesday illustrating the fact that Section 36B is clearly written. In this clip, Charles Krauthammer explains that the bill’s language is exceptionally straightforward: The language in the bill simply states that the subsidies are ony available to people purchasing health insurance through state-run exchanges. This doesn’t require guessing. It […]

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Halbig v. Burwell winners

Brian Beutler’s article attempts to make the case that Republicans might ultimately lose if the Supreme Court upholds today’s ruling: An adverse Supreme Court ruling would throw the ACA into chaos in three dozen states, including huge states like Florida and Texas. The vast majority of beneficiaries in those states would be suddenly unable to […]

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A smidgen here, a smidgen there

When President Obama told Bill O’Reilly that there wasn’t even a smidgen of corruption at the IRS, Americans rolled their eyes. They knew he was full of it. They knew it because they’d gotten to know Catherine Engelbrecht and how the federal government was used to persecute her for having the audacity of participating in […]

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Minnesota Supreme Court rules against citizens

If Patrick Condon’s article highlights anything, it’s that the courts really aren’t accessible to average citizens. With their ruling, the Minnesota Supreme Court essentially said that the judiciary is only for deep-pocketed people: The state’s high court ruled that former Republican Rep. Jim Knoblach would have to post an $11 million surety bond if he […]

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