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Paying the Danegeld

I suspect most of you have heard that Chancellor  Merkel has a plan to pay the immigrants she invited to Germany to go away again  Joshuapundit wrote about it here. Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel is facing new elections and is not doing at all well in the polls. Quite simply, the Muslim refugees she imported […]

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Great Moments in Foreign Government

Since I’m always reading and writing about government policies, both in America and around the world, I’m frequently reminded of H.L. Mencken’s famous observation about the shortcomings of “tolerable” government. If you take a close look at the world’s freest economies, you quickly learn that they are highly ranked mostly because of the even-worse governments […]

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The United Kingdom and the Benefits of Spending Restraint

When I debate one of my leftist friends about deficits, it’s often a strange experience because none of us actually care that much about red ink. I’m motivated instead by a desire to shrink the burden of government spending, so I argue for spending restraint rather than tax hikes that would “feed the beast.” And […]

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Sapphires and Duty

Yesterday was the sixty-fifth anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. By all reports, she spent it quietly at Sandringham, in Norfolk, where her father, the King died 65 years ago. She is now the longest reigning monarch in British History. And the only one to have parachuted into the Olympics! Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith […]

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Paraplegic British Cop Walks

What a remarkable story! But in a way, it’s not. It’s what happens in societies that are free to develop new ideas and revolutionary concepts. Remember, there was a day when the steam engine was just as remarkable. From Jewish News via Weaponsman Nicki Donnelly was confined to a wheelchair after being seriously injured in […]

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Getting to know you

I think we’ll lighten up a bit today, I was out most of yesterday, and didn’t get anything prepared, sometimes life gets in the way, doesn’t it? In any case, back in the forties, the average American GI, didn’t have much idea of what the Brits were like, and it seemed to the War Department […]

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The Hysterical Left, and Neil Gorsuch

I seem to have developed some form of flu. It’s rather distracting, so a short one today. In any case, I think Melanie is on to quite a lot here. It was an instructive year, as I watched (and participated in) as Britain discovered the words of the American founders to urge on the Brexit […]

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How we Got Trump

Mollie Hemingway wrote yesterday in The Federalist about Saying People Can’t Say ‘This Is Why Trump Won’ Is Why Trump Won. See, one of the reasons tens of millions of Americans voted for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton was that they were sick of this type of media bullying. But you’re not supposed to point out […]

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Mrs. May Goes to Washington

And so, Mrs. May is here. Came over yesterday, and will meet the President today. That’s as it should be, she’s first, the leader of our oldest friends, and strongest ally, and our cousins, so kind of a family reunion. Last night she spoke at the Republican Congressional winter retreat, the first world leader to […]

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Video Thursday

How about some videos today? Prime Minister May is coming over this week. What could be the best outcome for her, and for us? I think Dan Hannan has it right. Let’s do this, cousins.   This is how we all capitalize on Brexit, and the deal making Trump. A bit more, from BBC 4, […]

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A Bit of American Leadership

Sometimes that’s all it takes to change the world. Recently, Paul Bonecelli, wrote in The Federalist: President-elect Trump’s nomination of Rex Tillerson is clear evidence that Trump wants to change U.S. foreign policy and its posture in the world. For him, arguably no other choice would do but of an outsider with a record of setting […]

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Seriously but not Literally

I again quoted whoever it was that said we take Donald Trump seriously but not literally again last evening. It is true, we do, we voted for him because he looks to us like a real outsider, who is his own man, not an owned man of the progs. It was exactly the same impulse that […]

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Happy New Years Day!

So what shall we talk about to start the year? Could be almost anything, couldn’t it? Got all the same problems we did last year, but hey, I (and I suspect you) screwed off, last night, and the dog ate my homework. So we’ll start off with some stuff from other people. Like this year-end […]

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New Year thoughts

[One more of Jessica’s, because it reflects my beliefs as well, and is an excellent wrap up for the year. It’s been a very strange year, and in truth, I’m glad it’s ending. I should be home fairly late tonight, so with luck, I’ll have a new post for you tomorrow, although I’m not guaranteeing […]

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Going Home

As you read this, I’ll likely be on my way to the airport for my annual trip to the east coast. Yeah, I decided to fly this year rather than spending all that time on the train, while I enjoy it, it begins to pall a bit, so time to do something else. I’ve left […]

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Ordinary Joes

I’m going to talk about the upcoming Presidency some this week, and I think Jessica, in this post, speaks to part of the reason Trump won, and I thought it more reasonable to simply repost her article, than to extensively quote from it. We will be looking at some of the reasons but it surely […]

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Cardiff University, Chicago, and Purdue

None of those schools is very good at American football, lately. But they are good at something else, they are good at freedom, especially of speech. Jonathon Turley is one of the most passionate about free speech, real free speech. Maybe he picked it up at the University of Chicago, where he studied, as I […]

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The Coming of Christ, the Golden Blossom

Advent is, for Christians, a time of waiting, in some ways, it is like Lent, but not exactly, here we await the birth of the Lord, and by extension, his return in Glory. It is the time of beginning, of promise. My favorite Clerk gave us Sunday, a homily from an anonymous Anglo-Saxon author, in […]

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Queens and Presidents, and Duty

Melanie Phillips wrote in the £ Sunday Times about how the Queen Elizabeth II has to subsume the woman in the duty of the queen. It’s not a new theme for us, we spoke of her mother’s sense of duty owed to people and God in Duty Is the Rent You Pay For Life. It is something […]

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Castro, and the Reaction

Mom really did say that if you don’t have anything good to say about someone, especially a dead someone, then say nothing. It’s a good rule, helping avoid social friction and silly irritations. But I’m not sure that it really holds for public discourse on the death of public enemies. I can’t really imagine Winston Churchill, […]

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